Journal of Obstetric and Gynaecological Practices POGS

Register      Login

SEARCH WITHIN CONTENT

FIND ARTICLE

Volume / Issue

Online First

Related articles

VOLUME 2 , ISSUE 1 ( January-June, 2024 ) > List of Articles

Original Article

To Assess and Evaluate the Premenstrual and Menstrual Comprehensive Symptoms Scale for Grading the Menstrual Problems among Adolescent Girls

Bali N Thool, Sunita Shrivastav

Keywords : Adolescent's girls, Comprehensive menstrual symptoms, Gynecology, Menstruation, Obstetrics

Citation Information : Thool BN, Shrivastav S. To Assess and Evaluate the Premenstrual and Menstrual Comprehensive Symptoms Scale for Grading the Menstrual Problems among Adolescent Girls. J Obstet Gynaecol 2024; 2 (1):23-27.

DOI: 10.5005/jogyp-11012-0026

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 29-05-2024

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2024; The Author(s).


Abstract

Adolescence is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the period between the ages of 10 and 19. In India, adolescents make up 19.3% of the population. The onset of menarche marks this era. Menstrual cycle disorders or irregularities rank among the most common gynecological issues among adult females, particularly adolescents. The target population's most common menstrual issues include dysmenorrhea and premenstrual symptoms. In India, only 48% of teenage females know anything about menstruation before their first period. Extensive research instruments were not employed in the investigation to assess menstrual issues. Objective of study: • To assess the grading of premenstrual symptoms and menstrual symptoms. • To assess the premenstrual and menstrual symptoms score for different variables. • To check the reliability of the scale. Material: A standardized self-made comprehensive scale used. Research design: Observational, correlational, Interventional study. Techniques: Purposive sample technique. Sample size: A total of 12 adolescent girls in Wardha schools. Result: The study finding shows that a total of 12 samples are involved in the study of Premenstrual symptoms, and physical symptoms with a mean 24.8333, standard deviation 14.55918, minimum 14.00 and maximum 62.00, affective symptoms with mean 2.2500, The average symptoms are 3.36087, minimum and maximum values are 10.00; the average behavior and concentration symptoms are 0.6667, minimum and maximum values are 5.00; the average negative symptoms are 10.4167, minimum and maximum values are 8.00 and 19.00; the average PMDD symptoms are 27.5833, minimum and maximum values are 20.00 and 50.00; the average combined symptoms are 11.7500, minimum and maximum values are 7.00 and 30.00. For menstrual symptoms, physical symptoms were recorded with a mean of 26.7500, standard deviation: Of 14.89432, with minimum of 14.00 and maximum of 55.00 Average of 5.5833, standard deviation of 5.17790, lowest of 0.00, maximum of 15.00, were recorded for affective symptoms. Focus and conduct indicators were noted with an average of 1.1667, standard deviation of 2.51661, lowest 0.00, and highest 7.00, PMDD was assessed with a mean 6.3333, standard deviation of 3.82179, minimum of 3.00 and maximum of 16.00, and standard deviation of 4.83281, minimum 7.00 and maximum 21.00. Negative symptoms were reported with mean of 10.4167, PBAC with a mean 5.5833, standard deviation 1.31137, minimum 4.00 and maximum 8.00. The mean and standard deviation of dysmenorrhea were 12.3333, 3.86907, and 10.00 and 23.00, respectively, for the minimum and maximum values. The mean for menorrhagia was 5.5833, standard deviation of 1.31137, minimum of 4.00 and maximum of 8.00 and amenorrhea was recorded with a mean of 0.0, standard deviation 0.0, minimum 0.00 and maximum 0.00. Conclusion: According to the findings of the current study, premenstrual and menstrual symptoms scores for various variables are meaningful and can be used to gauge menstrual issues. A thorough teaching program on menarche and menstrual issues in schools could support girls in seeking appropriate medical care and coping more effectively.


PDF Share
  1. Negriff S, Dorn LD, Hillman JB, et al. The measurement of menstrual symptoms: Factor structure of the menstrual symptom questionnaire in adolescent girls. J Health Psychol 2009;14(7):899–908. DOI: 10.1177/1359105309340995.
  2. Baker FC, Lee KA. Menstrual cycle effects on sleep. Sleep Med Clin 2018;13(3):283–294. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsmc.2018.04.002.
  3. Omidvar S, Bakouei F, Amiri F, et al. Primary dysmenorrhea and menstrual symptoms in Indian female students: Prevalence, impact and management. Global Journal of Health Science [Internet] 2015. DOI: 10.5539/gjhs.v8n8p1351.
  4. Ameade EPK, Amalba A, Mohammed BS. Prevalence of dysmenorrhea among University students in Northern Ghana; Its impact and management strategies. BMC Women's Health 2018;18:39. DOI: 10.1186/s12905-018-0532-1.
  5. Mahon JN, Rohan KJ, Nillni YI, et al. The role of perceived control over anxiety in prospective symptom reports across the menstrual cycle. Arch Womens Ment Health 2015;18(2):239–246. DOI: 10.1007/s00737-014-0456-1.
  6. Negriff S, Dorn LD, Hillman JB, et al. The measurement of menstrual symptoms: Factor structure of the menstrual symptom questionnaire in adolescent girls. J Health Psychol 2009;14(7):899–908. DOI: 10.1177/1359105309340995.
  7. Elmaoğulları S, Aycan Z. Abnormal uterine bleeding in adolescents. J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol 2018;10(3):191–197. DOI: 10.4274/jcrpe.0014.
  8. Selin Elmaoğulları, ZeyraAycan. DOI: 10.4274/jcrpe.0014 Continuum (MinneapMinn) 2021;27(3):686–702. DOI: 10.1212/CON.0000000000001010.
  9. Pavlović JM. Headache in women. Lancet Child Adolescent Health 2018;2(9):677–688. DOI: 10.1212/CON.000000000000 1010.
  10. Ackerman KE, Misra M. Amenorrhoea in adolescent female athlete Lancet Child Adolesc Health 2018;2(9):677–688. DOI: 10.1016/S2352-4642(18)30145-7.
  11. Nillni YI, Rasmusson AM, Paul EL, et al. The impact of the menstrual cycle and underlying hormones in anxiety and PTSD: What do we know and where do we go from here? Curr Psychiatry Rep 2021;23(2):8. DOI: 10.1007/s11920-020-01221-9.
  12. Garber AK, Cheng J, Accurso EC, et al. Weight loss and illness severity in adolescents with atypical anorexia nervosa. Pediatrics 2019;144(6):e20192339. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2019-2339.
  13. Strock NCA, De Souza MJ, Mallinson RJ, et al. 12-months of increased dietary intake does not exacerbate disordered eating-related attitudes, stress, or depressive symptoms in women with exercise-associated menstrual disturbances: The REFUEL randomized controlled trial. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2023;152:106079. DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2023.106079.
  14. Bahrami A, Avan A, Sadeghnia HR, et al. High dose vitamin D supplementation can improve menstrual problems, dysmenorrhea, and premenstrual syndrome in adolescents. Gynecol Endocrinol 2018;34(8):659–663. DOI: 10.1080/09513590.2017.1423466.
  15. Manisha U, Anuradha L. Effect of high frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation at root level menstrual pain in primary dysmenorrhea. J Bodyw Mov Ther 2021;26:108–112. DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2020.12.025.
  16. Wong LP. Attitudes toward menstruation, menstrual-related symptoms, and premenstrual syndrome among adolescent girls: A rural school-based survey. Women Health 2011;51(4):340–364. DOI: 10.1080/03630242.2011.574792.
  17. Strock NCA, De Souza MJ, Mallinson RJ, et al. 12-months of increased dietary intake does not exacerbate disordered eating-related attitudes, stress, or depressive symptoms in women with exercise- associated menstrual disturbances: The REFUEL randomized controlled trial. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2023;152:106079. DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2023.106079.
  18. Huang C, Lin B, Yuan Y, et al. Associations of menstrual cycle regularity and length with cardiovascular diseases: A prospective study from UK Biobank. J Am Heart Assoc 2023;12(11):e029020. DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.122.029020.
  19. Armour M, Ee CC, Hao J, et al. Acupuncture and acupressure for premenstrual syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2018;8(8):CD005290. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005290.pub2.
PDF Share
PDF Share

© Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LTD.